Michigan Medicine Health Syste-Wide
 
Carol R. Bradford

Carol R. Bradford

Carol R. Bradford (M.D. 1986, Residency 1992), professor and chair of otolaryngology, was one of three recipients of the Castle Connolly National Physician of the Year Award, which recognizes physicians and leaders in health care whose dedication and skills have improved the lives of countless thousands of people throughout the world. Bradford is a leading clinician-investigator in the field of head and neck oncology who joined the U-M faculty in 1992. Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is the publisher of the consumer guide America’s Top Doctors.

 

 
Valerie Castle

Valerie Castle

Valerie Castle, M.D. (Fellowship 1990), the Ravitz Foundation Professor and chair of pediatrics and communicable diseases, has been elected to the American Pediatric Society Council for a term of five years. The mission of the society is to bring together men and women for the advancement of the study of children and their diseases, for the prevention of illness and the promotion of health in childhood, for the promotion of pediatric education and research, and to honor those who, by their contributions to pediatrics, have aided in its advancement.

 

 
Steven Donn

Steven Donn

The American Academy of Pediatrics has reappointed Steven Donn, M.D., professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases, as chair of the Committee on Medical Liability and Risk Management. Donn also was appointed to the International Advisory Board of the Journal of Perinatology, and to the Working Group on Pediatric Mass Critical Care, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. This group is charged with developing a plan for a pandemic flu disaster affecting pediatric patients.

 

 
Michael DiPietro

Michael DiPietro

Michael DiPietro M.D., the John F. Holt Collegiate Professor of Radiology, was awarded the 2009 Jack O. Haller Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Society for Pediatric Radiology. DiPietro is a pediatric radiologist at the U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and director of medical student education in radiology. The Society for Pediatric Radiology is a professional organization dedicated to leading the advancement of pediatric health care through medical imaging and image-related therapy.

 

 
Kim Eagle

Kim Eagle

The American College of Cardiology has selected Kim Eagle, M.D., to receive the designation of Master of the American College of Cardiology. Those earning this designation have served the college with distinction for more than 15 years. The college bestows the honor to only one or two of its more than 15,000 members each year. Eagle is the Albion Walter Hewlett Professor of Internal Medicine and a director of the Cardiovascular Center.

 

 
James Ferrara

James Ferrara

James Ferrara, M.D., the Ruth Heyn Professor of Pediatric Oncology and director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Regensburg in Germany, only the second time in nearly 15 years that the award has been bestowed. Ferrara, one of the world’s leading experts in the area of bone marrow transplantation, is a professor in the departments of pediatrics and communicable diseases and of internal medicine.

 

 
Friedhelm Hildebrandt

Friedhelm Hildebrandt

Friedhelm Hildebrandt, M.D., the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor for the Cure and Prevention of Birth Defects, is one of three world- renowned nephrologists honored by the PKD Foundation with the 2009 Lillian Jean Kaplan International Prize for Advancement in the Understanding of Polycystic Kidney Disease. A panel of worldwide experts representing the PKD Foundation and the International Society of Nephrology made the award selections. Those awarded the prize are pediatric nephrologists specializing in finding a treatment and cure for polycystic kidney disease in children and young adults.

 

 
Ella A. Kazerooni

Ella A. Kazerooni

Ella A. Kazerooni (M.D. 1988, Residency 1992), professor of radiology and director of cardiothoracic radiology, has been elected president of the American Roentgen Ray Society, the first and oldest radiology society in the U.S. In addition, Kazerooni was elected as a trustee of the American Board of Radiology, with responsibility for overseeing cardiopulmonary radiology. The board is one of 26 member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties. The Association of University Radiologists recently honored Kazerooni with the 2009 Gold Medal Award in recognition of especially distinguished service or contributions to the association, academic radiology or the field of radiology in general.

 

 
Theodore Lawrence

Theodore Lawrence

The American Society for Radiation Oncology has awarded its 2009 Gold Medal to Theodore Lawrence, M.D., Ph.D., who is the Isadore Lampe Professor and chair of radiation oncology. The Gold Medal is the society’s highest honor, awarded each year to two members throughout the country who have made outstanding contributions to the field of radiation oncology, including research, clinical care, teaching and service. The society is comprised of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology nurses, medical physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and biologists.

 

 
Rebecca M. Minter

Rebecca M. Minter

Rebecca M. Minter, M.D., assistant professor of surgery and of medical education, is the recipient of the Association for Surgical Education’s 2009 Outstanding Teaching Award. The association’s mission is to promote, recognize and reward excellence, innovation and scholarship in surgical education. Minter’s current research interests focus on immunomodulation of inflammation in the setting of chronic liver disease. She is actively involved in undergraduate and graduate medical education at the departmental, institutional and national levels.

 

 
Jeffrey L. Myers

Jeffrey L. Myers

The United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology recently presented the F.K. Mostofi Distinguished Service Award to Jeffrey L. Myers, M.D., who is the A. James French Professor of Diagnostic Pathology. The award is given to a member of the academy who has rendered outstanding service to the International Academy of Pathology and its U.S.-Canadian Division. Myers is recognized worldwide as a leading pulmonary pathologist, educator and administrator. The award is a tribute to the long and dedicated service given by Mostofi to the International Academy.

 

 
Gregory Wolf

Gregory Wolf

Gregory Wolf (M.D. 1973), professor of otolaryngology, has been named the recipient of the 2009 Albert C. Muse Prize, which recognizes Wolf’s profound contributions to medicine through early and continuing leadership in clinical research. The award is given by the Eye and Ear Foundation of Pittsburgh. Wolf’s leadership has provided the basis for changing the standard therapy for patients suffering from advanced laryngeal cancers, which has improved quality of life for countless Americans, according to the award citation. He served as chair of the Department of Otolaryngology from 1993 to 2008.

 

 
Philip Zazove

Philip Zazove

Faculty Profile

Philip Zazove Doesn’t Always Listen

Philip Zazove, M.D., has never listened to people who told him what he couldn’t do, and it isn’t because of his hearing loss. A family practice physician and U-M faculty member since 1989, Zazove was 4 years old before his parents, both physicians, discovered he was deaf when he asked his father to turn around and look at him when he spoke.

“Philip, I don’t have to look at you to hear you,” his father said.

“Yes, you do,” he answered. “How else could you hear me?”

Tests confirmed that, except for minimal hearing in the lowest range, their son was deaf. Instead of heeding experts’ advice to send him to a state institution, his parents enrolled him in public school, the first deaf child in the northern Chicago suburbs to be mainstreamed. After graduating from Northwestern, where he played intercollegiate football, Zazove met more skepticism when he set out to become a physician.

Despite outstanding grades, MCAT scores and recommendations, it was two years before any medical school would accept him. Finally, Rutgers agreed to give him a chance. After transferring to Washington University in his third year, he received his degree in 1978, completed his residency in family practice (though some of his professors viewed the specialty as a fad) at the University of Utah, and became one of the first deaf physicians in the U.S.

In addition to his practice, his work with the Association of Medical Professionals with Hearing Losses, and a host of administrative responsibilities, he’s published an acclaimed autobiography, When the Phone Rings, My Bed Shakes, ran (albeit unsuccessfully) for Michigan’s House of Representatives, and was the lead author of a recent study of the difficulties faced by deaf individuals, who generally use American Sign Language instead of English to access medical information.

“Deaf persons have been found to be the non-English speaking minority at greatest risk for miscommunication with their physicians,” Zazove says. “If we can help this group, there’s potential for helping other non-English speaking minorities. People who have a profound hearing loss in general have a lower understanding of how to cope.”

Hearing loss is the country’s second most common disability, affecting nearly one in 10 Americans, many of whom don’t want people to know. “My father used to tell people about my hearing,” Zazove says, “and I’d tell him, ‘Don’t tell them that, don’t tell them that.’ I didn’t want people looking at me.”

When they look at him now, it could be as an author as much as a physician. His second book, Four Days in Michigan, highlighting the conflict between the deaf and hearing communities in the 1940s and the early 21st century, is due out this summer. His third, a mystery featuring a deaf detective, is scheduled for 2010.

When Zazove opened his practice, he knew of only two other deaf physicians in the country. Now he estimates there are between 50 and 100, either in practice or training.

“The increase is probably due to a combination of factors, including some of us showing it could be done, the availability of technology, and the Americans with Disabilities Act that mandates equal access,” he says. “There are a lot of resources now that I didn’t have. But I’m still lucky: If I had been born in Romania, I wouldn’t be here today.”
—JEFF MORTIMER

 

 
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